Blogs
    5 posts
Taos and Reflections a Few Months In
How I ended up spending a month in Taos is a bit odd. You may not even know where Taos is — it’s a small town (population ~6000) in northern New Mexico. It’s known mostly as an artist’s community, similar to Santa Fe, but also for its amazing outdoor recreation with skiing, hiking, white-water rafting, and rock climbing all accessible. I ended up visiting Taos somewhat on a whim. When I was planning out my first few months of travel, I knew I wanted to check out northern New Mexico but didn’t know many cities there. I was thinking about staying in Santa Fe, the obvious choice, but didn’t like any of the Airbnbs I could find and I also knew it was fairly touristy. I saw Taos on the map, read a little about it, realized it sounded like a miniature version of Santa Fe with a lot of great outdoor opportunities and that was that. . . .
Enjoying the Moment in Austin
During my first couple weeks in Austin, I caught myself thinking about future destinations — tipped off by a moment of clarity while researching hikes in New Mexico. I realized that some of my thoughts about the future were yanking me away from the present and away from enjoying Austin to the fullest. Living in the future rather than the present and always dreaming of the next thing is an easy habit to fall into — “I just need a change of scenery and then things will be good” or “I just want to buy X and then things will be good”. It’s easy to think about the next place you are going, rather than taking complete advantage of wherever you currently are. Long-term travel can exacerbate this feeling. . . .
Observations After a Year of Meditation
I started experimenting with a meditation practice about a year-and-a-half ago and began practicing daily a bit over a year ago. As of this post, I’ve meditated every day for the last 430 days. I meditate anywhere between five and 45 minutes - lately it’s been about 30 minutes, with a total average of ~21 minutes. Earlier this week, I felt pure, red-hot, blood-boiling anger for the first time that I can remember since I started meditating and I credit my meditation practice for both the fact that I was able to get over my anger extremely quickly and for the fact that I can scarcely remember the last time I was actually really angry about something. My experience with meditation has been subtle, but still profound and there have been a few things in particular that I’ve noticed shifting over the last year. . . .